Cyborg R.A.T. 5 Gaming Mouse-Review 

The Cyborg range of R.A.T mice look a little like they were designed by a cross between Bill Gates' nerdier younger brother and a T800 Terminator! They are truly unique looking products that wont be to everyone's tastes, but the design and build quality is superb.  From the adjustable length and weight to the programmable buttons, this is a mouse you can make fit not only your hand, but your gameplay style as well, however, whether it fits in with your decor is another matter!  This review looks at the Cyborg R.A.T. 5. Gaming Mouse.


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Features                                                                                                               Tech Specs

Adjustable Length                                                                               DPI range - 125-4000dpi (in 125dpi steps)

Custom Weight System                                                                      Acceleration - 30G

Precision Aim Mode                                                                            Polling Rate -Dynamic up to 500Hz

UpTo 4000 DPI                                                                                     Tracking Speed - Up to 2.8m/sec

Custom DPI Settings                                                                           PTFE "Slick" Feet

9 'Button' Mouse                                                                                  Always On

5 Programmable Buttons                                                                   Gold plated connector

3 Modes                                                                                                Braided USB cable

Lightweight Metal Chasis


The comfort of your mouse should form a big part of your deliberation on which model to buy, this right handed rodent has a simple mechanism for lengthening itself which means most people should be able to make it fit their hand nicely, however it is quite wide, so very small hands should maybe steer clear.   Overall, I've found it be a very pleasant experience, even after many hours of play.  The metal chasis seems very strong but composed of a very light alloy for ease of movement and good durability, and the ergonomic design works brilliantly despite being of somewhat strange appearence, especially when opened up for the larger handed amongst us.

It has five, six gram weights that you can add to the underside for getting the 'feel' of the mouse just right for your tastes, a gimmick maybe, but a nice touch for those people who want the ultimate in customisability and one I found helpful as without any added, it does feel a little bit lightweight for my tastes.

The precision aim mode is activated by holding down a small button near the thumb buttons that once pressed, lowers your sensitivity by a set amount.  This is fully customisable over the four DPI settings and can be set at 0-100% of the normal sensitivity.  This is perfect for those moments when ultra precision is required, a click of one button and your crosshair is now under tighter control.cyborg-rat-7-precision_and_dpi

Up to 4000dpi is available with the R.A.T. 5, (even more with the R.A.T. 7 and 9!), and you have 4 settings you can switch between with the Mode Select button Each of these four settings can be adjusted to any value bewteen 125 and 4000, in 125 dpi steps, so you can have each mode adjusted to your exact requirements.  The mode select button sits in a handy to reach place without being easily pressed by mistake and the same can be said of the dpi adjust button as well.

Speaking of buttons, this mouse has an awful lot of buttons, it positively spoils its user with buttons, there are buttons everywhere!. It has 9 available with 5 of them being programmable.  You should be able to create a configuration that suits any game really well. 

Incoming button list:  Left and right mouse, a scroll wheel up and down which also has 2 micro switches, one that clicks straight down and one that clicks tilting to the left, (these both have the same effect and cannot be programmed seperately), a forward and back thumb button, a thumb scroller that can have a left scroll and right scroll programmed plus the mode select, dpi adjust and, finally, the precision aim.  

The programmable buttons can be renamed as you go and then each program can be added easily to other buttons in the same, or different, modes.  The software for setting up and programming your R.A.T. is quick and intuitive, each of the 5 buttons able to run through any sequence of  button press or keyboard stroke, and 3 different sets of programs, or modes, are available to select from .   As a competitive TF2 player playing medic, I have found this extremely useful.  Programming the back thumb button to automatically press '3' and then the 'left mouse' button, means I can have my melee weapon deployed in a fraction of a second with no fuss, a click down of my scroll wheel brings up my slot 1 weapon and the front thumb button equips whatever I have in slot 2.  I also have binds on the thumb scroller for calling out a fake uber charge by scrolling it left and an uber mask call scrolling to the right.  You can set three modes per config and you can save as many configs as you like so the variation is practically endless.  Superb stuff!


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On the downside, other gaming mice I've used have had a very thin cable to minimise weight and movement lag, this mouse seems to revel in it's thick and mighty cord, but it certainly wont wear out in a hurry!  Also, occasionally it's light weight means I find it hovering over my mouse pad, giving some mouse lag, but I feel this is more my own failings than a problem with the mouse itself.  Maybe I need to add more of the weights provided...

All in all this is an expensive, (around ¬£60), cool or weird looking, (depending on your point of view), well made, comfortable, massively customisable, well optioned, high quality, useful mouse.  Any gamer playing any game will soon find this mouse is suited to their needs.

Recommended. 


 

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Details here!

 

Category: Peripherals